ABOUT THE PERFORMANCE:

Friday, January 31 | 9pm -11pm

Trumpet Blossom Cafe

$10

Facebook Event

ABOUT THE COLLABORATION:

The Feed Me Weird Things collaboration is a series of online visual “mixtapes” created in response to a series of music performances. Each mixtape (or group of art) is culled from the permanent collections of the University of Iowa Stanley Museum of Art and paired with short essays. These essays and images provide an avenue for exploring overlaps between the aesthetic sensibilities of visual and sonic artforms. 

A central endeavor of art exhibitions and concert series alike is to introduce audiences to new ideas, or novel combinations and juxtapositions of old ideas. Musical curator Chris Wiersema (Mission Creek Festival) and visual curator Vero Rose Smith (Stanley Museum of Art) are united in their effort to carve out cavities for interesting conversations and cross-disciplinary connections. What is music? What is art? Where are the spaces between, and the intersections? What does it mean to listen and see deeply? The curators hold in common a belief that learning to listen and see with depth and empathy should not be limited to those able to receive specialized training. Sharing time, and attention, and physical proximity with others can create a natural empathy despite differences in personal identities and cultures.

ABOUT THE PERFORMERS:

Lea Bertucci

Lea Bertucci is a composer, performer and sound designer whose work describes relationships between acoustic phenomena and biological resonance. In addition to her instrumental practice with woodwind instruments, she incorporates multi-channel speaker arrays, electroacoustic feedback, extended instrumental technique and tape collage. In recent years, her projects have expanded toward site-responsive and site-specific sonic investigations of architecture. Deeply experimental, her work is unafraid to subvert musical expectation.
Her discography includes a number of solo and collaborative releases on independent labels and in 2018, she released the critically acclaimed Metal Aether on NNA tapes. Lea is co-editor of the multi-volume artists book The Tonebook, a survey of graphic scores by contemporary composers, published on Inpatient Press.
As a sound designer, Lea has collaborated with dance and theater companies including Big Dance Theater, Pig Iron Theater, Piehole!, and Mallory Catlett (Restless NYC). Her musical collaborations extend to other chamber-noise projects, notably a recently formed duo with vocalist Amirtha Kidambi, who will be releasing their debut album Phase Eclipse on Astral Spirits Records in the fall of 2019.
As a solo artist, she has performed extensively across the US and Europe with presenters such as The Museum of Modern Art New York, Blank Forms, Museo Reina Sofia Madrid, Pioneer Works, The Kitchen, Roulette, The Walker Museum, Caramoor, The Renaissance Society Chicago, Muziekgebeow Amsterdam, and Unsound Festival, Krakow. She is a 2016 MacDowell Fellow in composition and a 2015 ISSUE Project Room Artist-in-Residence. In 2018, she received a commission from the American Composers’ Forum for a new percussion trio as well as a brass octet commissioned by the Levy Gorvy Gallery in New York.

Saariselka

Saariselka is inspired by the meeting of earth and light, where slowly moving land masses merge with enveloping light fields. This sonic collaboration between composers Marielle Jakobsons (Fender Rhodes, organ, synthesizers) and Chuck Johnson (pedal steel guitar and treatments) is as expressive as it is enigmatic. On their debut album, The Ground Our Sky, a kind of new ambient Americana is unearthed and explored. The respectively singular artistry of Jakobsons (who previously cofounded the beguiling Date Palms) and Johnson collectively craft a universe of remarkable resonance. It is a vibrant, seemingly infinite sway of sounds that exists unmoored in time and space. The Ground Our Skygets its lift by pondering the universe not while staring up at the sky, but rather down at the ground – gazing into the earth, where we are all individually and collectively a meeting of the ground and the sky. This inverted perspective is at the heart of Saariselka’s music. That feeling of becoming ungrounded is universal and inevitable – and increasingly necessary to seize those rare opportunities for meaningful changes in perspective.

Hillary Schofield

Hillary Schofield grew up in Massachusetts. She received her BA in 2007 from The Evergreen State College in Olympia, WA, with a focus in Social Theory and Philosophy, and received her MFA in Performance Art from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2013. She’s a perennial student of nature, the inner realms, and traditional wisdoms, and practices bodywork and astrology, among other cherished arts and crafts.

Collection Highlights


Inka Essenhigh

Living Forest 

, 2011
Aquatint, drypoint, line etching on paper, 27 3/4 x 34 3/4 in. (70.49 x 88.27 cm)
Leola N. Bergmann Print Fund, 2013.9